Starting Seeds with Recyclables.

I'd read it all. From the high-tech, hundreds of dollars affair to the paper cup, dirt from the ground, I water it occasionally approach. The internet is full of wonder. So with all of this new found knowledge, I came up with a method I thought was worth starting with.

Our seed setup/warming area. And yes, that's a fire alarm back there.

Our seed setup/warming area. And yes, that's a fire alarm back there.

I recycle, like most, but I also try to reuse where I can and make pretty conscious decisions about the things I buy and consume. I read about the perks of a seed tray, but it just wasn't for me. Splurge on the seeds, figure out the rest within my means. So I started with a few aluminum trays I already had and a couple of Moe's Southwest Grill takeout containers (plants love these). The Moe's containers are practically little greenhouses. I'd grown some microgreens in the Moe's containers a few months ago with great success, so why not try again?

Our house is pretty chilly this time of year. Like most out in the country, we rely on propane to heat our home. We keep the thermostat around 62 or 64, to conserve as much of that energy and cost as we can. Propane isn't exactly cheap, after all. At any rate, that's a little cold for seeds to get their groove going. So to the top of the fridge they went. It's a surprisingly warm climate up there during the winter. The perfect substitute for an all-frills seed heating pad. 

As promised, within a couple of weeks, the seeds sprouted into darling little green bits. Begging for the promise of sunlight.

Our tomatoes of choice this year are Black Brandywine and Yellow Pear.

Our tomatoes of choice this year are Black Brandywine and Yellow Pear.

Wild Bergamot cozy in the Moe's takeout container

Wild Bergamot cozy in the Moe's takeout container

South facing window seal setup

South facing window seal setup

Corno Di Toro Sweet Bell Pepper

Corno Di Toro Sweet Bell Pepper

Corno Di Toro Sweet Bell Pepper

Corno Di Toro Sweet Bell Pepper

Starting Seeds

  1. Fill a tray or container with seed starting soil (something with vermiculite works best!)
  2. Plant seeds according to packet instructions.
  3. Moisten soil to the point of being damp, not soaked.
  4. Cover with plastic (Moe's takeout container has an awesome lid). Saran wrap works fine also.
  5. Place on top of refrigerator.
  6. Check soil moisture daily, spritzing as needed.
  7. Once the seeds have sprouted, move into the sunlight. Be conscious of room temperature. They still need to be kept warm. I use a window seal and have found it to be perfectly acceptable so long as I stay mindful of the room temperature. If the glass is freezing, so are the seeds.
Beekman 1802