Simple Microgreens

Several months ago I read an article about Microgreens in Modern Farmer magazine and become completely intrigued. I absolutely love sprouts and thought microgreens could be something fun to try, both from a gardening and culinary standpoint. I found two types of microgreens that interested me: Arugula and Bull's Blood Beet. I ordered organic seeds online through Johnny's Seeds, who I must say, very much impressed me with their super fast delivery time. A girl can't wait when she's this gun-ho about growing microgreens, if you know what I mean.

micro-arugula

Microgreens were a good 101 course in seed starting, prior to raising my own starters. Before planting, I did a ton of reading on light, temperature, soil depth, watering, and harvesting. Most of everything I read was geared towards large scale operations. "Make $4k a week growing microgreens". While tempting, I really just wanted a bit of fresh greens for a hummus sandwich or two. So I took all of that information and condensed it into my own DIY compilation. Here is what I found.

  • Moe's takeout containers are miniature greenhouses. Microgreens love these, particularly if you're relying on natural, and not artificial, light.
  • If you're using a window seal, rotate the container every couple of days so the greens get an equal amount of light.
  • Make sure your room is warm. Seeds won't be bribed to emerge in a freezing cold room. (Hey, I know the feeling! Early morning winter farm house problems.)
  • Water often, in small quantities. I use a spray bottle. Between the warmth of the environment, the damp soil, and greenhouse-like environment of the container, the 'greens went nuts.
  • If the plants have limp stems, they need more light and you've got very little room for error on this one. If they've wilted over, say your goodbyes and try again.
  • Don't overgrow. At about 1-2" high, it's time to eat!
  • To cut, or pull? I've tried both and find cutting to be the easiest. Pulling them entirely from the soil is fine if you want to spend a lot of time rinsing the soil off of very tiny little greens.
  • I always eat mine immediately after they're cut, however they can be stored for a brief period of time in the refrigerator. I recommend putting them in a mason jar with a moist paper towel at the bottom. They'll need air, so either ventilate the lid or leave it off completely.
If you've reading this with no clue where to get a Moe's takeout container, fear not. You can use other things, like an aluminum baking pan with plastic over top.

If you've reading this with no clue where to get a Moe's takeout container, fear not. You can use other things, like an aluminum baking pan with plastic over top.

Have you tried microgreens? I'd love your thoughts and insight on growing and consuming these delicious little treasures.

Beekman 1802